Scientific Highlights in Celiac Disease History

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50 AD
Aretaeus

Aretaeus

Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia first describes “The Coeliac Affection.”

The 1800s
A Chronic GI Condition

A Chronic GI Condition

Dr. Matthew Baillie describes a chronic G.I. condition that responds to a rice-heavy diet.

1888
The Banana Diet

The Banana Diet

Dr. Samuel Gee is the first to link diet as a treatment for celiac disease, calling for the "banana diet." It was used for decades.

1940s
Wheat and World War II

Wheat and World War II

During World War II, Dutch pediatrician Dr. William Dicke suggests wheat protein may be causing celiac disease symtpoms.

1950s
The Intestinal Biopsy

The Intestinal Biopsy

Dr. Margot Shiner discovers a tool to biopsy the intestine, helping to diagnose celiac disease.

1970s
Celiac Disease Gene Identified

Celiac Disease Gene Identified

HLA-DQ2 is identified as a key gene in celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis, key research that first recognized these as autoimmune conditions, not food allergies.

1990s
Celiac Disease Accepted as Autoimmune Disease

Celiac Disease Accepted as Autoimmune Disease

It took 20 years for celiac disease to be accepted as an autoimmune disease with a specific gene, despite the initial discovery in the 1970s.

1997
Testing Becomes Easier

Testing Becomes Easier

Dr. Detlef Schuppan discovers the role of tissue transglutaminase (tTG), making testing for celiac disease easier and cheaper.

2003
Celiac Disease is a Common Condition

Celiac Disease is a Common Condition

Dr. Alessio Fasano leads a landmark study that finds 1 in 133 Americans have celiac disease, proving it's more common than previously thought. More than 13,000 patients and family members gave blood samples for this study.

2004
Celiac Disease Reclassified

Celiac Disease Reclassified

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) holds the first ever consensus conference on celiac disease and re-classifies the disease from being rare to common.

2006
FALCPA Takes Effect

FALCPA Takes Effect

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act took effect on January 1, requiring packaged food products that contain any of the eight common allergens (including wheat) to always be listed in the ingredients list or in the ‘Contains’ statement.

2009
Celiac Disease Prevalence Increased

Celiac Disease Prevalence Increased

The Mayo Clinic discovers that celiac disease is now four times more common than it was in the 1950s. If left undiagnosed, a person is four times more likely to die early. Blood samples from more than 21,000 people made this study possible.  

2012
Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity is Explored

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity is Explored

A key study led by Dr. Alessio Fasano confirms that non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) does exist and is different than celiac disease.

2012
Diagnosis Rate Increases

Diagnosis Rate Increases

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and Sweden uncover that the diagnosis rate of celiac disease has dropped from 97% to 83%, a sign of increased celiac disease awareness.

2014
The Burden of Celiac Disease

The Burden of Celiac Disease

Patients say celiac disease is one of the most burdensome to treat, ranking second behind only end stage renal disease, in a study by the Celiac Center at BIDMC in Boston.

2014
FDA Rules on Gluten-Free Food Labeling

FDA Rules on Gluten-Free Food Labeling

All manufacturers of FDA-regulated packaged food making a gluten-free claim must comply with the guidelines outlined by the FDA as of August 5, an historic day for the celiac disease field.

2015
A Landmark Meeting

A Landmark Meeting

The FDA hosts the landmark GREAT3 Meeting to discuss the unmet needs of celiac disease patients and look for treatments beyond the gluten-free diet.

2015
Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials

As of spring 2015, only 11 clinical trials focused on new celiac disease treatment options were published.

2016
Healthcare Costs

Healthcare Costs

Celiac disease patients have healthcare costs up to nearly four times that of healthy controls, a University of Chicago study shows, revealing the gluten-free diet isn't the only increased expense.

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